Under the Cortex
2022 Spence Award Mini Episode: Jason Okonofua and the Power of Empathy

2022 Spence Award Mini Episode: Jason Okonofua and the Power of Empathy

March 29, 2022

The winners of the 2022 APS Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions represent some of the brightest and most innovative young psychological scientists in the world. In a series of mini-episodes, Under the Cortex talks with each winner about their research and goals.

Today, Jason Okonofua (University of California, Berkeley) tells us about his research on empathy and social-psychological processes that contribute to inequality.

2022 Spence Award Mini Episode: Investigating Complex Brain Processes

2022 Spence Award Mini Episode: Investigating Complex Brain Processes

March 22, 2022

The winners of the 2022 APS Janet Taylor Spence Award represent some of the brightest and most innovative young psychological scientists in the world. In a series of mini-episodes, Under the Cortex talks with each winner about their research and goals.

Today Oriel FeldmanHall (Brown University) tells us about her research to disentangle the cognitive and neural processes behind the complex choices that form the basis of human social behavior. 

2022 Spence Award Mini Episode: How People Manage Their Emotions

2022 Spence Award Mini Episode: How People Manage Their Emotions

March 18, 2022

The winners of the 2022 APS Spence Award represent some of the brightest and most innovative young psychological scientists in the world. In a series of mini-episodes, Under the Cortex talks with each winner about their research and goals.

Today we hear from Brett Ford (University of Toronto) who is examining the basic science and health implications of how individuals think about and manage their emotions. 

Mini Episode: How We Internalize Disorders

Mini Episode: How We Internalize Disorders

March 15, 2022

The winners of the 2022 APS Spence Award represent some of the brightest and most innovative young psychological scientists in the world. In a series of mini-episodes, Under the Cortex talks with each winner about their research and goals.

Today we hear from Antonia Kaczkurkin (Vanderbilt University) who is researching the neurobiological mechanisms of how we internalize disorders.

Constellations Across Cultures: How Our Visual Systems Pick Out Patterns in the Night Sky

Constellations Across Cultures: How Our Visual Systems Pick Out Patterns in the Night Sky

March 9, 2022

There are hundreds of billions of stars in our galaxy, though only about 5,000 are visible to the naked eye. Under ideal conditions and far from city lights, you can see about half of them on any given night. Cultures the world over see similar shapes in the night sky--the Big Dipper, Orion, and the Pleiades are just a few. New research, as discussed by Charles Kemp and published in the journal Psychological Science, reveals that our visual processing system may explain the striking commonality of constellations across cultures. Read the transcript here

Image credit: Milky Way from the Atacama Desert by Derek Demeter 

Freedom vs Security: Can We Find the Right Balance?

Freedom vs Security: Can We Find the Right Balance?

February 23, 2022

During the pandemic and when other natural disasters strike, governments may curtail certain liberties in an effort to save lives. These compromises also happen in everyday life, from seatbelt laws to food-safety regulations. A paper published in Perspectives on Psychological Science, however, suggests that restricting freedoms may have other unintended negative consequences for behavior and health. One of the authors, Nathan Cheek with Princeton University, explains how there may be a balance that can be achieved and how psychological science could help policymakers promote public health, safety, and well-being in times of crisis.

 

To read the transcript, see here

Debunking Four Common Myths of Psychological Science

Debunking Four Common Myths of Psychological Science

February 2, 2022

You hear them so often they must be true! Or are they? Popular myths about the human brain include old chestnuts like people only use 10% of their brains, too much sugar sends kids into hyperdrive, and there are left-brain and right-brain personalities. 

How did these beliefs get started and why are they so widespread? Charles Blue and Ludmila Nunes take a skeptical deep dive to explore some the most common myths about psychological science and the brain.  

These are just some of the facts and debunking you'll find on the Association for Psychological Science's Myths and Misinformation Research Topic page. 

The Grieving Brain

The Grieving Brain

January 19, 2022

Loss of a loved one is something everyone experiences, but we have had little scientific perspective on this universal experience. Renowned grief expert, neuroscientist, and psychologist Mary-Frances O’Connor shares groundbreaking discoveries about what happens in our brain when we grieve, providing a new paradigm for understanding love, loss, and learning. In this interview she also discusses her upcoming book,  "The Grieving Brain: The Surprising Science of How We Learn from Love and Loss."

The Top 10 of 2021: Psychological Science in the News

The Top 10 of 2021: Psychological Science in the News

December 29, 2021

Looking back on the year that was, APS's Charles Blue and Ludmila Nunes discuss the top stories from the world of psychological science in 2021. 

Better Behavior With Virtual Reality

Better Behavior With Virtual Reality

December 20, 2021

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. This well-known saying is known as the “Golden Rule. Simply put, it means to treat others the way you want to be treated. The moral principle behind the Golden Rule is admirable, but it’s not always how things happen in the real world. It if were, there would be less crime and fewer conflicts. But what if you were visiting a virtual world? Might it be possible to experience the harmful actions you take from the perspective of the victim? Could these VR experiences help us live by the Golden Rule?

Mel Slater, a researcher with the University of Barcelona and author on a paper published in the journal Current Directions in Psychological Science, explains how we might foster prosocial behavior with virtual reality.

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