Under the Cortex
Out of the Box and Into the Lab, Mimes Help Us ‘See’ Objects That Don’t Exist

Out of the Box and Into the Lab, Mimes Help Us ‘See’ Objects That Don’t Exist

April 1, 2021

Human brains can do more than simply imagine the presence of nonexistent objects. Our minds can automatically create well-defined representations of objects that are merely implied rather than seen, like the obstacles in a mime’s performance. These findings could aid in the development of artificial intelligence related to vision and navigation by helping understand how humans perceive and navigate their environments. Chaz Firestone (Johns Hopkins University) and Pat Little (New York University) talk with Charles Blue about their Psychological Science paper on mimes and implied surface. 

Read the full news release here

Special Episode: 6 Young Researchers Discuss the Forefront of Psychological Science

Special Episode: 6 Young Researchers Discuss the Forefront of Psychological Science

March 19, 2021

Many organizations present awards that recognize outstanding scientific achievement in a variety of disciplines, but these are typically given later in a scientist’s career. There are many scientists, however, who have made exceptional contributions and discoveries early in their careers. These researchers tend to be on the cutting edge of new and exciting fields. To recognize these deserving younger researchers, the Association for Psychological Science presents the Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions. Since its inauguration, the Spence Award has gone to more than 70 outstanding psychological scientists.

In this special episode of Under the Cortex, we talk with some of the most recent Spence Award winners. Each is considered one of APS’s most creative and promising investigators. Today, you’ll hear from six of them: Arielle Baskin-Sommers from Yale University, Sudeep Bhatia from the University of Pennsylvania, Eiko Fried from Leiden University, Celeste Kidd from the University of California at Berkeley, Steven Roberts from Stanford University, and Daisy Singla from the University of Toronto.

Read more about their backgrounds in the latest edition of the Observer.

Emotion and Long-Lasting Attitudes and Opinions

Emotion and Long-Lasting Attitudes and Opinions

March 8, 2021

Past studies have demonstrated that opinions based on hard facts and data can remain constant for many years, but new research published in the journal Psychological Science reveals that attitudes based on feelings and emotions can also stand the test of time. Charles Blue interviews Matthew Rocklage and Andrew Luttrell, authors of the Psychological Science article "Attitudes Based on Feelings: Fixed and Fleeting?" Read the full news release here

Methodologies and the Evolution of Science: A chat with a science journalist

Methodologies and the Evolution of Science: A chat with a science journalist

February 26, 2021

Reflecting on the President's Column in the March/April issue of the Observer, NPR science correspondent Joe Palca, who earned a PhD in psychology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, offers his unique take on the evolution of methodologies in science, from landers on Mars to big data and psychological science.  

Horse Brain and the Human Brain

Horse Brain and the Human Brain

February 24, 2021

APS's Charles Blue talks with APS Founding Member Dr. Janet Jones, author of the book Horse Brain, Human Brain. With her background as a brain scientist, horse trainer, and writer, Dr. Jones has unique insights into applying brain function to the training of horses and riders. 

Training to Wisely Navigate Social Conflicts

Training to Wisely Navigate Social Conflicts

February 9, 2021

Social conflicts, from policy debates to family disagreements, can easily devolve into angry words and personal attacks. Such heated confrontations, however, seldom resolve disagreements and can entrench opposing views. A better approach to resolving interpersonal disagreements is to embrace characteristics that psychological scientists associate with wisdom, like intellectual humility, diverse viewpoints, and open-mindedness. APS's Charles Blue interviews Igor Grossmann about his recent research on training for wisdom. 

How Depression and Stress Could Dampen Efficacy of COVID-19 Vaccines

How Depression and Stress Could Dampen Efficacy of COVID-19 Vaccines

January 18, 2021

Health behaviors and emotional stressors can alter the body’s ability to develop an immune response to vaccines, including—potentially—the new COVID-19 vaccines. Simple interventions, including exercising and getting a good night’s sleep in the 24 hours before vaccination, may maximize the vaccine’s initial effectiveness. We interview Annelise Madison of The Ohio State University about a recently accepted paper in Perspectives on Psychological Science explaining the mind-body connection and the COVID-19 vaccine. 

2020 Year in Review: Breakthroughs and Discoveries in Psychological Science

2020 Year in Review: Breakthroughs and Discoveries in Psychological Science

January 11, 2021

What happens when the APS media relations director chats with the APS senior science writer? A fun discussion on 2020's most interesting research, that's what!

Many of the major news stories of 2020 were closely tied to understanding human behavior, including efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19, understand political divides and social conflicts, and address enduring racial disparities and inequality.  

A wealth of research published by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) addresses these and other important topics. The following is a selection of some of APS’s most newsworthy research and highly cited publications from 2020. These stories emphasize the importance of peer-reviewed psychological research and its impact on society.  Read the full list here: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/breakthroughs-and-discoveries-in-psychological-science-2020-year-in-review.html 

The Challenges of Military Veterans in Their Transition to the Workplace

The Challenges of Military Veterans in Their Transition to the Workplace

January 7, 2021

Long-standing structural features of the military have created a culture and society that is dramatically different and disconnected from civilian society. Thus, veterans transitioning to civilian society face a number of challenges related to fulfilling basic psychological needs. To explore this issue in detail APS's Charles Blue interviews Steven Shepherd and David Sherman about their recently published paper "The Challenges of Military Veterans in Their Transition to the Workplace: A Call for Integrating Basic and Applied Psychological Science." 

Primatology and Psychology: Shedding Light on Culture and Behavior

Primatology and Psychology: Shedding Light on Culture and Behavior

January 4, 2021

Dr. Frans B. M. de Waal is a Dutch/American biologist and primatologist known for his work on the behavior and social intelligence of primates. His latest research concerns empathy and cooperation, inequity aversion and social cognition in chimpanzees, bonobos, and other species. In a discussion with APS's Charles Blue, Frans explores the connection between primatology and psychology and how they intersect on issues of culture and behavior. 

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